Mastery

Hello World!

This is my first attempt at public blogging and anyone reading this will suffer the pains expected from reading the work of a “newb.” I have already forgiven myself for the audacity of inflicting my opinions upon the world and I hope you will be similarly quick to forgive.

I finished a book today called “Mastery” by Robert Greene. Good book. In no way lacking in interest and inspiration, but I found myself surprised in my inability to take Mr. Greene’s, very well researched and articulately portrayed, words as actionable or even as a full picture of the concept of mastery. The words had vast implications about the evolution of the human race and our conscious role we play, by seeking mastery, in taking the next evolutionary steps for our species, the idea of which I find very attractive, but I felt it was missing a certain something.

As the final story, about the literary and scientific master, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was shared and it’s lesson on mastery duly summarized I began to identify the source of my apprehensions and lack of motivation to practice what Mr. Greene was preaching to reach mastery. The book failed to discuss or even hint at the possibility that there is definitive mastery of oneself, a level of mastery that makes one master of being a human-being.

Greene, discussed at length the entire spectrum of mastery in particular subjects, everything from basketball to the laws of the universe, and not once was there a mention of an objective level of self-awareness or self-realization that could be called self-mastery. And, from my very earliest readings of the spiritual/occult, it was obvious, if not assumed, by almost all authorities, that there is an objective and even measurable level of self-mastery that earns one the title of being a Master. Not a master of this or that, but simply a master.

Coming upon this realization, I immediately understood why it was left out. Greene’s personal beliefs aside, most of his audience wouldn’t have expected or appreciated such “hooey” as a “universal master level” in an otherwise scientifically grounded work. Still, I think my stance on the book, as it progressed, remained very objective and open to Mr. Greene’s words and perspective, yet the potent feeling that something was missing remained, chapter after chapter. I believe this, along with the resolution of this feeling that accompanied the realization that the missing thing was most likely this “universal master”, to be proof that there must be a level of mastery, most likely measurable only by those who have reached it, that is the same in every human’s path of evolution. Why else, would Mr. Greene’s extensive account of mastery itself, leave so much to be desired on the subject?

If the subject of mastery, is in fact a subject with strong implications on human evolution, as Mr. Greene suggests, then I think, even without finding physical proof, we can assume that the potential for such mastery exists in every human. I think we may also assume that there are no blindingly bright halos above those who have reached mastery and so we must be wary of trusting those who claim to be masters lest we are steered toward the wrong goal. I beleive the surest way to reach the correct goal, and even the goal itself, is precisely what was missing from Robert Greene’s “Mastery.” A complete focus on self-mastery above all other forms of mastery. This way, only you can know what progress is and only you can judge how close you are to your goal.

If you have read the book or simply have something to comment on regarding the subject of mastery, please share below.